TS 1 - WORD OF ARCHIVE. LANGUAGE, MEMORY AND POWER IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY FROM THE RELIGIOUS MISSÕES - 16 TO 20 CENTURIES

Juciene Ricarte Cardoso UFCG/CHAM-UNL

The ways in which indigenous people were conceptualized and responded to the colonial apparatus were, in some cases, again expressions of the ideas that had previously been formulated by the conquerors; the same ones that aimed to minimize the vividness of indigenous history and put it into forms that would make it intelligible to the astute Europeans. A clear example of this can be found in Art and Vocabulary, among others, which was written with the aim of grammaticalization and reducing indigenous languages as part of the spread of Christianity as a form of political organization in the New World. In this way, various expressions typical of the indigenous world were mistranslated, reinterpreted, or left aside in order to reduce the Indigenous world to the European experience, as already mentioned, and, of course, to impose colonial domination based on the control of Indian memory, which was to be achieved through the suppression of the indigenous language and its vitality in official documents. However, this suppression was only partial, as several colonial documents quote indigenous voices in the form of statements about their social organization; the same ones that were later misinterpreted. There are indigenous categories in the archives, just as we find them in the edited documents. The Indigenous way of conceptualizing a world in constant flux allows us to understand the process of social, economic, material, ideological, symbolic and imaginary reproduction of different Indigenous communities over time; it allows us to historicize social change by critically inquiring into the existence of Indigenous categories in the Archives, seeing them as a network of meanings that served to provide tools for the social control of those who became Other through conquest. In this way, we invite historians, anthropologists, linguists, specialists in historical cartography, semioticians as well as contemporary indigenous researchers to discuss the role of the Archive, and the documentation kept there for the reappraisal of indigenous history in Abya Yala.

  

TS 2 - INDIGENOUS TERRITORIES AND TERRITORIALIZATIONS IN ABYA YALA 

Joanan Marques de Mendonça – PPHIST – UFPA

Renata Ferreira de Oliveira – PPGH – UFBA, Professor at IFNMG - Salinas campus

The aim of the symposium is to bring together studies that address the various processes of territorialization imposed on indigenous peoples throughout American history, as well as indigenous policies to protect and preserve their original territories. In this sense, dialogue with historical anthropological studies is important, as these have problematized the formation of nations based on the extension of the boundaries of certain social groups and their cosmogonies over indigenous lands. To understand this historical phenomenon, the concept of territoriality, according to João Pacheco de Oliveira (1998), can be understood as the collective effort of a particular social group to occupy and control a certain space, transforming it into their territory physically and symbolically. These processes emerge in the context of conflicts in which the expansion of the borders of the nation-state was imposed on various ethnic groups who suffered a double dispossession: firstly, when they were reduced and territorialized in villages, for example, and secondly, when they lost their reserved or donated land through the expansion of colonization. Against this double attack, indigenous peoples had to work out elements of group unification again and again in the struggle to preserve their territories. A process that is on the well-being current agenda. This proposed theme therefore aims to provide a space for the presentation of new and ongoing research that stimulates debate on the problem of indigenous territories and the strategies they use to defend their lives and heritage.

 

TS 3 - HEALTH / WELL BEING AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES 

Maria de Lourdes Beldi de Alcantara – USP/FM, IWGIA Consultant - Scientific Coordinator of AJI

Indianara Ramires Guarani – Treasurer of AJI - USP/FM

The aim of this symposium is to bring together contributions on the topic of health/well-being among indigenous peoples. It's already known that western medicine doesn't address the discomfort and illness of these people. During the pandemic COVID -19 this was evident; abandoned by health systems, indigenous peoples had to resort to their traditional treatments to protect themselves from contagion and disease. This moment was described, in the words of Marcel Mauss, as a total social fact. The neglect and inadequacy of health protocols to Indigenous realities made them and us realize that medical protocols, even if the cultural issue is emphasized, don't correspond to the ontology of Indigenous peoples in the Americas. Given this reality, how can we have a discussion based on different ontologies about health and a good life? How can dialogical bridges be created that lead to the proposed treatments being followed? These are the challenges that Western health care faces when confronted with cultural diversity. We'll give preference to papers that bring us field research with an intercultural focus.

  

TS 4 - HUMAN RIGHTS/ETHNIC RIGHTS AND TERRITORIES: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND QUILOMBOLA COMMUNITIES IN ABYA YALA 

Lorena Lima Moura Varão. Professor of Law at UFT/ UNB

Natasha Karenina de Sousa Rego ( UFPI)

Erina Batista Gomes, National Secretariat of Traditional Fishing, MP, Brazil

The process of dispossession/eviction of indigenous peoples and quilombolas from their territories continues latently in the 21st century and their international rights are denied. Throughout the history of Abya Yala, after the invasion by the Europeans, the enemies of these peoples have repeatedly tried to bury their knowledge and cultural and religious practices and force the dispossession of these ethnic groups in order to expand the project of death, which is manifested in the capitalist activities of agribusiness, water business, biopiracy, mining, illegal timber trade, extensive cattle ranching, tourism, construction of roads and highways, slave-like labor and much more on the traditional and ancestral lands of the peoples and communities. In this context, these people, subjected to economic and/or religious interests, are subjected to invasions, dispossession, threats and threatened violence in their territories. Given a history of rights violations up to the present, this Thematic Symposium is a space for a collective of scientific communications that address the history of struggles and reflections on research and activism, as well as current challenges to the preservation of culture, the guarantee of rights and the defense of public policies for indigenous peoples and quilombolas. This shows that the state is aware of the seriousness of the problem and approves of this, especially under the current government. In this way, it's clear that the road is arduous and requires struggles and confrontational strategies for dismantling the destructive patterns created by the capitalist-colonial world system. It's worth pointing out that peoples' and communities' lands are important areas of biodiversity, which confirms that the damage doesn't only affect them, but the whole society.

  

TS 5 - ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY, INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE, SPIRITUALITIES AND COSMOVISIONS: INTERDISCIPLINARY DIALOGUES IN THE PAST AND PRESENT 

José Otávio Aguiar, UFCG, Paraíba, Brazil

Andre Figueiredo Rodrigues Unesp, Assis, SP, Brazil

José Otávio Aguiar, UFCG, Paraíba, Brazil

Andre Figueiredo Rodrigues Unesp, Assis, SP, Brazil

This Thematic Symposium is a space for the reception of oral communications and discussions for researchers whose work contributes to the debate on environmental and indigenous issues. Since the second half of the 20th century, environmental issues have received special attention worldwide, mobilizing and interacting knowledge. In response to this growing concern, Environmental History has facilitated the coming together of the natural and social sciences, focusing on building dialogues based on studies of ethnic identity, natural resource use and management, and traditional knowledge, among others. The aim of this WG is to promote dialogues and encounters between researchers exploring the relationships between nature, culture, history, spirituality, the sacred, cosmovision/nature and indigenous ethnicity from the sixteenth century to the present day, in order to highlight the role of ancestral visions and knowledge in the development of technologies and knowledge for nature management.

  

TS 6 - BORDER SOCIETIES IN DIFFERENT SPACES AND TEMPORALITIES IN AMERICA 

Izabel Missagia de Mattos - UFRRJ, Brazil

This thematic symposium will address possible different meanings in studies of frontiers in different historical spaces and times in Latin America. Such studies are characterized by different disciplinary approaches. In these spaces of interaction, there are often clashes between different fields and creative processes of adaptation. Even in situations of extreme violence, the actors involved can interact to negotiate the conditions for their survival and the new conditions for territorialization, either diplomatically or through wars and insurgencies. For the description and analysis of borders, the routes, journeys and circuits within them - such as rivers, ports and roads - that reveal cultural landscapes and other ecological/symbolic dimensions, the negotiations between indigenous peoples and adventurers, the displacements of people, the nature of economic production, the knowledge associated with these processes and trade with foreign countries are of strategic importance. By making visible the important role of indigenous subjects in their relationship to other subjects in the creation of worlds, border studies point to the need to examine all sides of national history and other areas of academic knowledge. Highlighting such processes in spaces far removed from the "centers’ of power brings what is considered "marginal" in traditional historiography to the centre of discussion on important issues such as the participation of indigenous peoples in the colonial economy, the production of inequalities and racialization, the making of the rule of law and nationhood in the postcolonial period.

  

TS 7 - DIGITAL HUMANITIES AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES: DEMOCRATIZATION OF MEMORY, HISTORY AND HUMAN RIGHTS 

Carmen Alveal - UFRN, Brazil

Marina Monteiro Machado - UERJ, Brazil

The concepts of Digital Humanities are gaining importance in various fields of knowledge, especially in the fields of indigenous history, archival and anthropology. Starting from an interdisciplinary discussion that also the history of indigenous women began long before the presence of European colonizers in Abya Yala. However, after colonization, indigenous women suffered violence from inter-ethnic contact. Some were trafficked and even stolen from their families, often raped to serve the colonizers, and used as forced laborer’s. They were forced to become wives, cooks, housekeepers, farmers, artisans and other roles assigned to women, but always they resisted. They struggled and continue to struggle today against the inequalities imposed on them, both within ethnic groups and due to the violations of rights by the so-called Western society from the 16th century to the present day. To confront these and other historical difficulties, indigenous women have organized themselves into movements, associations, and other forms of collective articulation. They fight for rights such as the conquest of territories, public health and education policies that ensure a life of dignity for their ethnic groups. Nevertheless, this thematic symposium wishes to receive oral contributions that address the history, memory and struggles of indigenous women in the past and present of Abya Yala addresses the phenomena of information, heritage and memory, and history, this thematic symposium aims to receive oral contributions that discuss the importance of documentary collections in terms of virtual accessibility, which has contributed to the production of historical and anthropological knowledge about indigenous peoples in the Americas.

  

TS 8 - INDIGENOUS SCHOOL EDUCATION: CHALLENGES, RIGHTS VIOLATIONS AND ACHIEVEMENTS THROUGHOUT THE HISTORY OF ABYA YALA 

Rosilene Tuxá - UNIFAP/MEC

Edson Kayapó - IFBA

In recent decades, indigenous peoples of the Americas, through their social movements and various organizations, have conquered rights to recognition of their social organizations, symbolic values, traditions, knowledge and the processes of knowledge constitution and cultural transmission for future generations. The extension of these rights to the field of education has given indigenous peoples the opportunity to appropriate the institution of school and give it their own identity and specific functions. The European-influenced school, introduced to the Americas since the 16th century, is a historical space of values imposition and assimilation for the incorporation of Western beliefs and the valorization of the market economy, and in this process, it has destroyed identities; it's now claimed by indigenous communities as a site for the construction and redefinition of intercultural relations based on the decolonization and political autonomy of non-Western peoples. Against this backdrop, this thematic symposium is a space for discussions and presentations of papers that address the different periods of the history of indigenous schooling and assess the recovery of historical memories, languages and indigenous peoples' knowledge in relation to knowledge in accordance with the social projects defined by each original people who historically resist with their ancestral knowledge in the Abya Yala from the sixteenth century to the present.

  

TS 9 - COMMUNITIES AND ETHNIC GROUPS IN THE AMERICAN STATES: PROJECTS AND POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, STRUGGLES AND RESISTANCES - 20TH CENTURY TO PRESENT DAY 

Sandra M. Taborda Parra. Pablo de Olavide University (Sevilla, España).

Marisel Montero Carpio. Autonomous Metropolitan University - UAM (Xochimilco, Mexico.

Javier Hernández García. Observatory of Cultural Heritage - University of Cartagena

The various dictatorships and social revolutions, the economic exploitation of ethnic territories, political persecutions and the eradication of communities and their leaders have shaped the political participation and mobility of communities and ethnic groups in Latin American countries until today. In recent years, these groups have increasingly participated in the national agenda. This is thanks to the actions carried out for the recognition of rights violated by different organizations, agencies and/or groups on the margins of legality, the positioning of groups, associations and political leaders claiming the historical presence of this sector and its banners, as well as the construction of an organizational agenda working for the restoration of social, political and economic rights at the local and regional levels. In this sense, this symposium aims to bring together research that addresses the projects and political participation of communities and ethnic groups in Latin America from the twentieth century to the present. It'll examine the processes of incorporation of ethnic communities and their contributions to the construction of Latin American states, their participation in state policies, and the actions of these communities in their identity politics, organizational, social and economic struggles.

  

TS 10 - INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE CARIBBEAN: MEETING BETWEEN COASTAL AND ANDEAN CULTURES 

Juan Carlos Vargas - UNIMAGDALENA

Fabio Silva – UNIMAGDALENA

Nayibe Gutiérrez – Pablo de Olavide University

The Caribbean has stood out as one of the regions characterized by extensive networks of integration and interaction between different local and foreign cultural and thought traditions. This symposium offers a discussion among experts on the various encounters that the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean and the Andes have had over time, in areas such as economics, politics, worldviews and their processes of change. Experts from the fields of archaeology, history and anthropology are invited to contribute to this discussion with their respective reflections.

 

TS 11 - INDIGENOUS VERBAL AND VISUAL ARTS: CONTEXTS AND DIVERSITIES OF EXPRESSION 

Brigitte Thierion - CREPAL/Sorbonne Nouvelle

Fábio Almeida de Carvalho - Insikiran- PPGL/UFRR

Roberto Mibielli - PPGL/UFRR

The Thematic Symposium Indigenous Verbal and Visual Arts: Contexts and Expressive Diversity accepts oral contributions that address various aspects of indigenous verbal and visual arts circulating in contemporary national and international contexts, from a perspective that emphasizes different forms of expression and temporality in artistic production and in the elaboration and maintenance of contemporary theoretical-critical debate.

  

TS 12 - VESTIGES, TRANSFORMATIONS AND PERMANENCE IN FUNERARY PRACTICES, RITUALS AND PLACES OF BURIAL IN PLURICULTURAL AMERICA 

Diego Andrés Bernal Botero. History Program / Pontificia Bolivariana University, Medellín – Colombia

The gradual arrival of Europeans in the American territory since the end of the 15th century brought about far-reaching and notorious transformations in the lifestyles and mentalities of both the original inhabitants of this continent and those who left the 'old world' and immersed themselves in an unknown land, which they tried to adapt to their habits, not without changing many of their habits and prejudices. One of the aspects that the populations that were in contact with each other had to deal with was the funerary practices, rituals, and burial sites, because the traditions and eschatological ideas that underpinned them were very distant from each other and clashed to a great extent, leading to new confrontations and misinterpretations. For this reason, this symposium welcomes proposals dealing with the historical and historiographical, anthropological and ethno-religious analysis of the remains of pre-Hispanic funerary cults and practices, as well as the changes they underwent during the more than five centuries of syncretism; the variations in Christian rites brought to and enshrined in the Americas, and the gradual transformation of burial sites, driven primarily by Bourbon and Pombal reformism, but also related to the occurrence of epidemics, the mobility of urban centers, and the adaptations of ever-changing societies in the midst of a diverse and multicultural Americas.

    

TS 13 - HISTORY OF INDIGENOUS WOMEN IN ABYA YALÁ IN THE PAST AND PRESENT 

Juciene Ricarte Cardoso Tarairiú PPGH-UFCG, Brazil and CHAM/UNL, Portugal

The history of indigenous women began long before the presence of European colonizers in Abya Yala. However, after colonization, indigenous women suffered violence from inter-ethnic contact. Some were trafficked and even stolen from their families, often raped to serve the colonizers, and used as forced laborer’s. They were forced to become wives, cooks, housekeepers, farmers, artisans and other roles assigned to women, but always they resisted. They struggled and continue to struggle today against the inequalities imposed on them, both within ethnic groups and due to the violations of rights by the so-called Western society from the 16th century to the present day. To confront these and other historical difficulties, indigenous women have organized themselves into movements, associations, and other forms of collective articulation. They fight for rights such as the conquest of territories, public health and education policies that ensure a life of dignity for their ethnic groups. Nevertheless, this thematic symposium wishes to receive oral contributions that address the history, memory and struggles of indigenous women in the past and present of Abya Yala.

 
 

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